Conservatism and Liberty – taking another hit

Posted by on Mar 24, 2017 in Slideshow | 0 comments

It’s been a busy week legislatively, and it did not turn out well for conservatism or liberty. First, the Senate Education Committee considered a bill that would require students to use the bathroom of their gender, and not what gender they decided to call themselves. In a surprising move, the committee killed the bill. It’s likely that the defeat was heavily influenced by a statement Lt. Gov. Randy McNally made last week. He said the bill was no longer needed in light of the federal government’s recent action.  Killing the bill highlights the short-sightedness of many legislators. His statement and republicans on the committee killing the measure assume that the proponents of debauchery will give up pushing their deviant agenda. And, they assume that democrats will never have the majority in congress again. Republicans are wrong in both assumptions. Secondly, the House Civil Justice Subcommittee heard a bill that would have changed the matrix of Civil Asset Forfeiture. HB0421 would have mandated that a person’s assets could not be forfeited unless that person was convicted of a crime, and the conviction could prove that assets to be forfeited were obtained through criminal activity. This bill would have brought state law enforcement officers into constitutional compliance by protecting the citizenry’s Due Process as spelled out in Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments of the U.S. Constitution. It would have also brought Civil Asset Forfeiture into compliance with our state Constitution Art. 1, Section 7 which states that people shall be secure in their persons, homes, papers and possessions, and protected from unreasonable searches and seizures. Killing this bill shreds the fundamental liberties Americans are entitled to, and furthers the belief that we’re becoming a police state. Of the seven subcommittee members hearing the bill, only two voted for passage. Among the five members who voted to kill the bill was Andrew Farmer. So, if you are ever stopped by law enforcement and happen to have cash in your possession, and the officer simply suspects you obtained that cash illegal, expect the officer to confiscate it. Citizens still have to prove their innocence, instead of being presumed innocent until proven guilty. Lastly, the House Transportation Committee heard the Improve act, the bill that would raise fuel taxes. I wrote you after the Transportation Subcommittee hearing, stating that I expected all amendments adopted by the Subcommittee — including the language from Hawk’s bill– to be stripped at the full committee hearing. I was right. Rep. Dale Carr did propose an amendment at the full committee hearing that would have diverted 33.5% of existing new-car sales tax to TDOT as a user fee. His amendment was praised by several republicans as the way to to. But, his amendment was...

Read More

State History

Posted by on Mar 21, 2017 in Slideshow | 0 comments

There’s a lot of state history not taught to our youth. You’ve probably heard of the Battle of Athens, but only from folks who wanted to share the story. Here’s another piece of history not taught to our kids. But both events are in Tennessee’s Blue Book ( this story on page 42), the book that also contains our state Constitution. So the question is, why is this history good enough for the Blue Book, but not good enough to be taught in school ? ____________________________________________________ Another clash between community practices and the forces of modernity took place in 1908 at Reelfoot Lake in the northwest corner of the state. The lake, an exceptionally rich fishery and game habitat, had for many years supported local fishermen and hunters who supplied West Tennessee hotels and restaurants with fish, turtles, swans, and ducks. Outside businessmen and their lawyers began buying up the lake and shoreline in order to develop it as a private resort. In the process, they denied access to the lake to local citizens who had long made their livelihoods from it. Some of these people, having failed to stop the developers in court, resorted to the old custom of vigilante acts or night-riding to stop them. Dressed in masks and cloaked in darkness, the night riders terrorized county officials, kidnapped two land company lawyers, and lynched one of them in the autumn of 1908. Governor Patterson called out the state militia to quell the violence; eight night riders were brought to trial, but all eventually went free. Fearing further outbreaks of violence over the private development of the lake, the state began to acquire the lake property as a public resource. In 1925 Reelfoot Lake was established as a state game and fish preserve, marking a first step toward the conservation of Tennessee’s natural resources. Ironically, at the very time that Tennessee’s rural culture was under attack by city critics, its musicfound a national audience. In 1925 WSM, a powerful Nashville radio station, began broadcasting a weekly program of live music which was soon dubbed the “Grand Ole Opry.”...

Read More

Josiah Bartlett

Posted by on Mar 21, 2017 in Slideshow | 0 comments

Josiah Bartlett (No middle name) Born: November 21, 1729 Died: May 19, 1795 Josiah Bartlett was born November 21, 1729 to Stephan & Hannah-Mary Bartlett (Webster) in Amesbury Massachusetts. The 5th child and 4th son born to the Bartlett’s of Amesbury. By age 17 Josiah knew Greek and Latin and studied to become a physician. Studying under Dr. Ordway of Amesbury, colony of New Hampshire Josiah married his first cousin, daughter of his uncle Joseph, Mary Bartlett on January 15, 1754 together they had 10 children, 3 son’s  and 7 daughters, Mary1754, Lois 1756, Miriam 1758, Rhoda 1760, Hannah 1763 (died as an infant), Levi 1762, Josiah 1768, Ezra 1770, Sarah 1773,  and Hannah 1776 (also died as an infant. All three of his sons and 7 of his grandson’s became physicians. They stayed married until her death on July 14, 1789.     Josiah became active in politics for his county of Kingston New Hampshire and was elected to the colonial assembly in 1756 and appointed Colonel of the county’s militia. Governor John Wentworth appointed him as a Justice of the Peace. As the Revolution neared, his Whig policies brought him into conflict with the British Governor John Wentworth. In 1774, Josiah Bartlett joined the Assembly Committee of Correspondence and began working with the other leaders of the 12 other Colonies. Governor Wentworth dismissed Josiah Bartlett for his revolutionary politics which were illegal in the eyes of the Crown. Shortly after that Josiah Bartlett’s home was burned to the ground, a total loss. The fire was allegedly set by Tories, A Tory is a Colonial citizen who sided with the British Crown against the Revolution, and no one was ever convicted for the burning of his home. Josiah Bartlett began rebuilding his home and farm after the fire, and turned down an appointment as a delegate to the Continental Congress with John Pickering, to attend to his family and their needs. Josiah remained very active in New Hampshire politics. In 1775 as one of his last acts Governor Wentworth made before being driven out of New Hampshire revoked Josiah Bartlett’s commission as Justice of the Peace, and his commission as Colonel of the New Hampshire militia, and as Assemblyman for his county.     In 1775 Josiah was again selected to be a delegate at the Continental Congress at this time he accepted and became the only delegate from New Hampshire. Most of the work done at the Continental congress was done in committees and at least one delegate from each colony was on a committee which meant Josiah was on all the committees,  Safety, Secrecy, Munitions, Marine, and Civil Government. After several letters back to New Hampshire...

Read More

Samuel Adams

Posted by on Feb 17, 2017 in Slideshow | 0 comments

Samuel Adams was born to Samuel Adams Sr. and Mary (Fifield) Smith in Boston, Massachusetts on September 27, 1722. Samuel Jr. is second cousin to John Adams. Samuel was one of twelve children born to the Adams. His mother Mary was very religious and the family attended the Old South Congregational Church in. Samuel Jr. and his family lived on Purchase St in Boston. Samuel Sr. owned a Barley House. Born: September 27, 1722 Died: October 2, 1803, at the age of 81 years Old Samuel Adams went to the Boston Latin School then on to Harvard University where he graduated in 1740. He then continued at Harvard University for his Master’s Degree, which he received in 1743. Samuel decided not to become a lawyer, and his parents wanted him to become a Minister, but he went to work for The” Thomas Cushing Counting House”. It now would be called “The Accounting Firm”. Failing at that, Samuel went to work at his father’s Barley House.  A facility that gets grain and soaks it in water allowing it to grow then converts it to malt for beer and other malt beverages. Samuel’s father died in 1748 at an early age, leaving Samuel to run the family’s Estate and affairs. He didn’t manage the family finances very well and the Malt House or Brewery didn’t do well either. It was during this time, he discovered his true love was politics. Samuel Adams became fearful of the British Governments ill motives, which formed the bases for Samuel to become motivated to the Rebel cause. Fearing the British rule exercising power over the Colonist in arbitrary and destructive ways, Samuel also feared the British officials would come in and seize his family’s estate and holdings at will. In 1748 Samuel, along with friends, purchased “The Independent Adviser”, a weekly newspaper, that printed many essays against the British Crown for their act of pressing citizens into the British Navy “The act of Pressing or Shanghai is the beating or cohesion of citizen’s and kidnapping them against their will and taking them to a British ship and pressing them into the Kings Service for an unspecified length of time”.  The largest pressing came in 1757 in New York City in which over 800 citizens were pressed into service of the King. Samuel and his friends, through their newspaper, urged his countrymen to rise up and boycott English imports and demonstrations against “Taxation without Representation”. Samuel Adams was against violence and did not support the demonstration that caused the “Boston Massacre in 1770”. In 1749 Samuel Adams married Elisabeth Checkley and together they had 6 children. Only 2 children lived to adulthood, they were Samuel &...

Read More

It’s a New Day in America!

Posted by on Jan 21, 2017 in Slideshow, Words from the Chairman | 0 comments

There are so many good things to say about today’s peaceful transition of power. There’s no way I can list all of them. But hopefully, I can sum it up by saying that Marxism has been rejected by the American people, and hope for constitutional governance has once again been embraced. It just doesn’t get any better’n that. The mood of today is a complete contrast to when the Marxist was sworn in. Eight years ago, there were tears of despair and fear. Today, those same people from eight years ago have tears of joy and hope.  May God give our new president the wisdom needed to see this nation back to the values that built this great nation. As destructive as Obama has been to this nation, I must say that he has done one great thing: He is responsible for the effective Liberty movement. Having said that, I would like to dedicate the following song to ex-president Barrack Hussein Obama. In Liberty, Steve Osborn SCTP...

Read More

RINOs!!! What are they doing – again? Nothing of substance

Posted by on Dec 8, 2016 in Slideshow, Words from the Chairman | 0 comments

I think we’re getting a good idea of what changes we’ll see in Washington with a completely republican controlled federal government.  Not much, I’m afraid. Shortly after Trump’s victory, certain prominent republican senators stated that repealing ObamaCare will take years. The logic is, in short, it’s so embedded now that to repeal it without harming the minority of citizens who benefited from it makes repealing ObamaCare very difficult, especially if there’s not a federal program to replace it. Translation: We really have no desire or intention to repeal ObamaCare. Ramming federal programs down the throats of an unwilling public is a piece of cake for us, but getting rid of a federal program once it’s in place takes an act of God, and only if we in congress vote to obey Him. Next, we learned on Wednesday, Dec. 7th, that the House voted to refer the resolution to impeach IRS Director Koskinen back to the House Judiciary Committee. Taking a cursory look at the vote records, Congressman Roe was among the 100 or so republicans who joined the democrats in referring the issue back to Committee. This vote doesn’t outright reject the idea of impeaching Koskinen, but in truth kills any hope of doing so. The vote allows Roe and others to pound the table demanding that something be done. It also allows them to tell their constituents they really want to impeach Koskinen. But referring it back to the Committee does indeed kill the effort to impeach, and they know it. Remember; Koskinen is they guy who, among other things, ran cover for his predecessor Lois Lerner by destroying electronic files. This is the guy who destroyed and hid Lerner’s emails from Congress that likely showed her and Obama coordinated to block 501(c) status for hundreds of liberty groups. This is the guy who stonewalled the congressional investigation into the IRS’s targeting liberty groups. This is the guy who lied to congress during that investigation. And this is the guy who continues to target liberty groups. And this is the guy who congress voted not to impeach. Just on the face of it, this one vote alone should reveal what the body congress thinks of the American people, the Rule of Law, and their perception of what powers they have in Washington. Lastly, renowned conservative columnist Ben Shaprio tweeted the results of an anonymous poll of congressional members. Ben Shapiro  ✔@benshapiro 57% of Republicans think free markets hurt us. 78% think gov should bribe companies. 75% think gov should threaten companies. Welp. 6:05 PM – 6 Dec 2016 That’s just the percentage of republicans Shaprio tweeted about. We already know 100% of the democrats think this way. Personally, I’m hard pressed...

Read More